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How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

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How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Simon Lake on Sat 13 Mar - 13:54

Our cartoon strip jam on the forum is an exercise in triggering the imagination, which is basically a tool used by Cartoonists to expand their minds and come up with ideas. It's all about association and how one thing can lead to another (in the case of strip cartooning). It's also all about having fun. If you are serious about cartooning and you really have a desire to know why didn't I think of that? then stay tuned... Nobody is blessed with the gift of coming up with jokes or cartoon ideas at will. Like a lot of things, it has to be worked at, struggled with, and sweated over and basically practised a lot.
Other tools used are:
1. Memory Maps
2. Puns/ Thesaurus (A play on words)
3. Observation of real life. (Misery turned into humour)
4. Exaggeration
5. Milking (Observation of other cartoonist's gags and coming up with a better alternative)
6. dah de dah...........
Personally, I keep any scrap of paper and blunt pencil wherever I go for prosperity. I could be sitting in the Pub and an idea will just come to me that is going to make me an absolute fortune (This happens a lot). It's important though, the memory is only so good and you if you are anything like me, you'll be kicking yourself for ages for not writing it down. It may not appear to look so good the next day, but then neither will you. (Lol)
I try to set myself a goal everyday of jotting down at least 10 "potential gags", be it for Private Eye, erm... Private Eye, or YES!....The markets are dwindling, but that's still no excuse. Think Greetings cards! And tee shirts and other memorabilia. Let's be positive now, and don't forget about that web site you are gonna put out there!
A single panel gag is basically a one- off mainly drawn to fit a single column width in a newspaper or magazine. (Wow!....that will be £45? .....hardly a career) The opportunities in this regard have gone very dismal with the advent of the internet. Why? Well for a start, no one really bothers so much with newspapers anymore when they can catch up online. The same goes for risque humor in Adult mags. Porn is so so widely accessible online that no dirty old man can be bothered to buy Hustler anymore. But having said all this, there has never before been wider opportunities. It's all just a matter of putting yourself out there without the need for sucking up to some Editor.
To get back to the subject, and what we are all about on this Forum, just as it is possible to improve our own drawing ability, so is it with thinking - there are techniques which can be learned, and which will raise the level of your cartooning to a professional standard, worthy of publication.
LET'S START WITH SOME OF THE BASIC TOOLS INVOLVED IN THE THINKING PROCESS...
1. Your ears.
Listen to jokes and (urgh!) the comedy shows on telly and think how you may be able to adjust them in a way that you think would look good in print. Start a joke collection, they can be very cheesy but you'll be surprised what could be accepted by an unsuspecting Editor! Your greatest source of inspiration is PEOPLE. Everyday jokes or basic banter can be a very rich source of inspiration. Watch Eastenders for 5 minutes and draw from the misery of life.......they love it! We are as Cartoonists (or potentially so), are basically in the Entertainment Industry and these things can collide. I struggle to watch telly these days, it's just all so weak and contrived. *Adapt* jokes to portray them in a visual form.
2. Use your eyes.
So often we walk, and even drive around, oblivious to our surroundings. They become so familiar to us that we switch off to what's happening. As a cartoonist, you are a hunter - on the lookout for the unusual, the interesting, the zany, and the plain ridiculous. ITS A JUNGLE OF IDEAS OUT THERE, so be prepared and be alert!
Learn how to look at your surroundings with new eyes and jot things down. Not everything you try to capture will lead on to finished work, but some of it certainly will, surely?
3. Reading.
This is a good habit anyway, and for cartoon inspiration, it is an excellent way to pick up ideas......from newspapers, books, mags, the internet etc. It doesn't take a lot to spark an idea. What you read in "Farmer's Weekly" may well be adjusted to "Hustler Australia". Give us a break here?
Tell all your friends you are now in the cartooning business, and ask them to save any good jokes for you. They'll love it when you show them your finished version, and they will be chuffed to see it in print, or indeed, on the web!
4. Joke situations.
You may think your life is boring, but humor can be derived from boredom to a very big extent. A large proportion of cartoons are actually derived from the very ordinary things in life. The list of potential joke situations is endless, although sometimes you may have to strain your brain to think of them. Let's take "Driving" as a very random example. Here are a few:
* Braking too slowly/ too fast/ brakes don't work/ brakes working too well.
* Bumpy roads/ sticky roads (melting tarmac)
* Hand signals
* Reversing
* Parking problems/ fitting in a space that's too small for a car
* Juggernauts in narrow streets
* Hand- brake problems
* Car radio too loud/ powerful speakers
* Road rage/ being cut off.
* New car/ showing off.
* Two- car families.
* Car wash problems
* "Name strips" on windscreens or "Racing strips".
* Gear changing
* Car mechanics/ estimates/ repairs. (What's the damage?)
* Learner drivers
* Emergency stop.
* Traffic Wardens (a potential goldmine, this one!)
* The idiot who has to be first away from traffic lights.
* Driving gloves/ driving socks?
* Failing the MOT. A sluggish nodding dog?
* Pelican crossings/ Zebra crossings
* Customized cars.
* Driving abroad on the wrong side of the road.
* Flash cars.
* Back seat drivers/ passengers.
* Flat or bald tyres/ traffic Cop,
* Oil change/ dip stick
* One way streets
* Road works.
* Traffic jams/ rush hour.
* Squashed hedgehogs.
* Accessories. (I pad, hands free mobile phone, Satnav etc)
* Flat battery/ road signs/ Highway code.
* Taxi drivers
* Hard shoulder.
* Roundabouts
* Police cars.
* The fanatic who washes his car everyday, regardless of the weather.
* Car salesman.
* Air bags.
* Window stickers/ Is my driving ok?
* Towing/ stalling at traffic lights/ speeding/ crawling.
I could go on and on. But you get the idea?
Narrow them down to "Car Salesman" and I'll give you:
Part exchange
Guarantees
Previous owners
turning back the clock
Hire purchase
"Or nearest offer"
"Needs slight attention"
No reasonable offer refused
So you never need to be stuck for potential joke situations....YOU CAN USE THIS SAME METHOD FOR ANY SUBJECT WHATSOEVER.
When you've got the situation eg: Car salesman, and then a sub- heading, eg: "Previous owners", think how the situation might be depicted if the previous owner was a Vicar, or a builder or a Google millionaire for that matter.
COMMUNAL BRAINSTORMING
This is an excellent way to come up with ideas- by sharing it with your friends at a dinner party. Once they get wind of the fact that you are soon to become famous and make a fortune as a cartoonist, they are all going to want a piece. It beats Twister or Charades in my opinion and you may even come away with a few ideas for potential gags. Use the letters of the alphabet:
Abseiling
Bingo
Cars
Dogs
Engines
Fish
Golf
Igloos
Jammy tarts
Kangaroos
Light bulbs/ blonds
Magician
You get the picture?
Let's go back to the encyclopedia salesman and explore the possibilities there......what possible obstacles could he meet? What tricks could he employ to get his foot in the door? What sort of person could open the door to him? What reason could the occupant have for not wanting the encyclopedias? What sort of thing would a child say to him? How would he react to a Rottweiler?
A few reminders
Don't worry if all you can think of is "corny" jokes. Sometimes they can be the best one's
If you are struggling with ideas, don't stress, it's life.
Use your eyes
....and ears
Read
Collect jokes from TV/ radio/ friends etc
Brainstorm

Here are some useful links:

http://magazine-cartooning.com/ideas.html

http://www.ehow.com/way_5485876_gag-cartooning-tips.html

http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/37/04704268/0470426837.pdf

http://moesky.hubpages.com/hub/How-To-Become-A-Cartoonist

http://joseph-giunta.suite101.com/cartoon-gag-writing-a220346

http://www.noz.com.au/stepbystep.html


Last edited by Simon on Tue 9 Apr - 19:40; edited 5 times in total
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by cartunes-r-us on Sat 13 Mar - 20:03

An excellent subject for a topic, Simon, and I feel a day is wasted if I don't at least think up at least 3 useable gags: a good day will yeild about 20 workable ideas. I agree, write them down, even brilliant ideas can be forgotten. I used to keep scraps of paper with ideas, but I try and transfer most of them into a proper notebook: I've currently got at least 1000 unused ideas written down there: most are usable....but even the weaker ones can later be strengthened, thus adapted for use .


I agree that just passing people in the street and listening to their spontaneous quips can often trigger ideas, and a lot of my ideas happen while having a bath [must do it more than anually!] Grafting together two unlikely subjects kangaroo/suit of armour for example is often enough to kick-start an idea, as can joining in properly in forums like this one...


[This week's EGG ideas and gags have infiltrated my own BABY BOOMER comic strips, and I reckon I'll introduce themes of gags involving 'anthromorphosised' breakfast beings, which can provide a new 'branch' for my strip to delve into.]


I also find inspiration from song lyrics, often adapting them literally: 'Dark side of the Moon', etc, etc.



Just letting your imagination rip is the single best tip; brilliant stimulus for the mind when you discover a great gag: if you can get paid for doing this, you are well sussed.
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by grantw on Thu 25 Mar - 15:49

Great article, I read it with interest....the expanding situations via props, other characters, characters physical/mental state etc is a great way to develop ideas as is "milking" [guilty!] I often see a cartoon and then think of a related gag. Song lyrics are also an area I use, and I must say that I have my best ideas just as I'm about to drop off! Great tips guys!
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Simon Lake on Fri 26 Mar - 5:25

Milking certainly ain't a crime, Grant. It's an Art form in itself, as old as the hills. It can also be a very useful way of breaking into the market. In the UK we have a National paper that used to encourage it as part of a feature called: "Sunfun", and it was great fun. Private Eye magazine does this to a certain extent as well with typical themes running such as:"Are you looking at my bird?" They are well recognized as "milking" gags and that is the whole idea behind the humor. I love looking at other cartoonists work and thinking how I can turn it around from say, a single panel gag to a strip for example, or from a mag gag to a Greetings card. I consider it a challenge to go one better than them. The possibilities are endless. Consider these scenarios:

* Neighborly wives gossiping by the fence. (eg. "You won't believe what you've been up to!")
* Hubby catching Wife in bed with stranger or vice- versa.
* Learner drivers.
* Cupid/ Dating Agency.
* Relate/ Marriage guidance.
* Desert Island. (Yes, I reckon you can still get away with the odd one these days!)
* Beauty Salon.
* Tunnel of love.
* Hubby and Wife at party- either chatting up someone else of the opposite love making.
* Mr. and Mrs. Smith booking into Hotel.
* Suicidal person (usually a Man!) on ledge.
* Dog and Postman.
* Lottery ticket.
* Your dinner is in......(Note left for Hubby)
* Wife's cooking.
* Nudist Colony.
* Dog in Pub.
* Hubby returning from Pub.
* Adam and Eve.
* Lost Property Department.
* Missing Person's Bureaux.
* Suggestions box.
* Just married.
* Interview/ Employment Agency.
* Birds and bees speech.
* Mum gone out and Dad and kids trying to cope.
* Wife visiting Hubby in jail.
* Man in Pub talking to Barmaid. "My wife doesn't understand me."
* Estate Agents.
* "Does my bum look big in this?" (Goldmine, this one!")
* Prisoners hanging from chains. (Very well documented)
* Trying on clothes in shop.
* Mother in Law.
* Failure in bed.
* Not remembering Anniversary.
* Hospital. (Nil by mouth notice.)
* Party animal.
* Noah's arc.
* Couple lying on beach- Man ogling fitter female.
* Internet shopping.
* Affairs.
* Selling matches.
* Hobos on park bench.
* Lovers' Lane.
* Drunk and Cop.
* Groom late for Wedding.
* Dad with face buried in newspaper at breakfast table. (eg. "Mum, what does Dad look like?"
* Stag party/ Hen night.
* Excuse to go to the Pub.
* Hubby couch potato/ no exercise/ no fresh air.
* Door to door salesman.
* Perfume counter in shop.
* Fridge magnets.
* Dad giving Daughter's date a hard time.
* Report card.
* "Waiter, there's a fly in my soup!"
* Milkman/ Father's eyes.

These were the common themes that were prolific in The Sun newspaper, but there's nothing to stop anyone trying their luck with other publications/ greetings cards/ briefs or whatever. The bottom line is THERE IS NO COPYRIGHT ON IDEAS.


Last edited by Simon on Tue 9 Apr - 19:41; edited 4 times in total
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Hagen_Cartoons on Wed 19 May - 1:06

As a scientist (my day job), I can program so I've made myself a program that spits out randomly generated lists with 4 columns:

subject - location - prop - action

I have 4 files containing a list of subjects (in my case, animals), locations, props and actions. I read through this and ideas are often generated by this seemingly random list...

Basically, here is a sample list...

SUBJECT LOCATION PROP ACTION
dog quick-sand postscard drawing
lamb cliff club CPR
bug garage glider parachuting
pelican iceberg dice fishing
fish bath knife play-piano
dragon cinema broom digging
eagle canteen radio play-soccer
moose hospital key fishing
mongoose quick-sand crane singing
kangaroo cinema pan diving
sheep massage-parlour money acting

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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by LeahG on Wed 19 May - 10:47

Tha's very clever Hagen, good idea.
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by ricklondon on Sun 6 Jun - 2:57

Thank you Simon. These are wonderful ideas; many of which I've not thought. I do a good deal of mountain hiking and that is generally where I get my inspiration; as I run into a good deal of wildlife interacting with each other. I just put my mind in a "What would Gary Larson Write?" type of mood, and it generally begins to flow. I think the main thing is to "enjoy the process". So many times when I was just starting (13 years ago), I seemed to be a lot more interested in "the results" than "the process". That changed over the years; as, it was truly when I stopped trying, in fact had quit writing and went back to school; that I realized that my offbeat cartoon site was not only number one on Google, but receiving close to 4000 hits per hour; about 1.8 million per year (starting in 2005). My entire world turned around. I thought it was all a joke at first. It was for real. So your ideas are sound (and fun); if I'd known we were going to be successful, I would have stopped trying so hard for success, and truly enjoyed the gag writing and interaction with our fine team of illustrators and watching all the pieces fall into place. Thanks, Rick London Londons Times Cartoons[url=http://www.londonstimes.us]

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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Simon Lake on Sun 6 Jun - 13:13

Ah yes that sounds all too familiar. It's like the curse of the vivid mind. Larson sure knew how to milk it though. I also find a visit to the gym gets the creative thought process going. I don't want that to sound like a pilgrimige(sic) to Mecca or Tibet or something like Zen but it helps to clean out the cobwebs.

Good Man, Sounds like you were in the right place at the right time. Very Happy
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by haydnlock on Sat 6 Nov - 1:22

HAYDN LOCKS



HUMOUR

How do you write a great joke? How do we tease or be funny? How not to take current affairs seriously? A humorist would appreciate irony and won’t always look for a pun. However word play is a great place to start. The truth is humour is a business. Historic cartoonist, ‘Bateman’ once said his jokes were only funny when he had stopped laughing. Its no laughing matter, humour is a business. It can be very lucrative; however it has always kept me poor. We live in a community where people do not want strangers giving any funny business unless it‘s within the comfort zone of their own circle of friends or if they pay for it.




There is no perfect gag. What one person finds funny can be completely misunderstood by another. So the first rule is not to expect others to appreciate what the like minded people you share the same joke with as funny. Usually humour invented within a group is only laughed upon by those in on the joke.





People have laughed at those more unfortunate than themselves. Charlie Chaplin mastered this in his tramp character. His humour, slapstick, was appreciated worldwide because it relied on visuals gags and not words so it needed little translation. We all know when you have to explain a joke it loses its magic. He took his business very seriously. Several failed marriages and disagreements with the FBI did not stop him from making people laugh. Spike Milligan was classed as a genius and crafted the art to such a high standard and inspired many comedians for more than fifty years. He was a manic depressant and on occasions he had to sign himself into a psychiatric ward to prevent him doing harm to himself and others. However these where humorist of the past and they are very much frowned upon by young people. In December 2008 Efestivals polls rated Spike Milligan in the top ten for being the worst UK comedian.

http://www.efestivals.co.uk/forums/index.php?showtopic=112179



So moving onto what do today’s younger people find funny. The Efestival polls claim the top ten comedians are:

1. Peter Kay
2. Lee Evans
3. Alan Carr (King of Puns)
4. Catherine Tate
5. Dawn French
6. Rowan Atkinson
7. Al Murray
8. Jack Dee (Dead Pan)
9. Eddie Izzard
10. Frankie Boyle


Theses comedians take people’s habits and moments and recapture them, then they are exaggerated back. It is very rare for young people to laugh at puns. Humour has grown up and Broken Britain, dysfunctional families, health, religion, race and sex is entertaining the masses to such an extreme that politicians were force to introduce political correctness. Although Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean) disagrees with political correctness, it is to prevent the right of freedom to speak from being abused by hate humour like racist jokes. However these types of jokes are shared in closed groups. Political correctness can create a fear of experimenting with humour. You see if a joke makes another person feel uncomfortable then it can be misunderstood as harassment.





Experts recommend to write what you know about or are interested in. I am a fan of surrealism, irony and current affairs. The surrealism structure is where that subconscious mind meets consciousness, with an unexpected twist;

‘I have just taken the cat to the vet for a yearly flu injection. The cat told me I was very brave and I will not need another one until next year,’

or when unlikely items are put together to tell a story;

‘I have a sad story to tell. When working in a shoe shop I noticed a poor kid with a packet of crisp on each foot instead of shoes. Before I could express my sadness the kid told me not to worry. Those packets of crisp on his feet were the latest fashion brand known as ‘Walkers’.



Not all humour needs a punch line. To capture an awkward moment that we all share is often laughed upon,

‘I said a very odd comment to the cashier at Sainsbury. We spoke of our pets, I have a cat and she has a dog. She mentioned ‘I’m a dog person and not keen on cats’ I replied ‘I don’t mind cats or dogs. My family raised me with both pets; however I don’t like crocodiles or sharks’. She gave me an uncomfortable silence. 'Bitch! I am not a bitch person.'

There is nothing wrong with being odd. Parodies are great tool for this.




'In the beginning there was nothing, absolutely nothing. Well actually there was something and that was a slight whiff of methane. So, apart from methane, there was nothing. Oh! There was something else. It was extremely cold, so apart from methane and really cold temperatures, there was nothing. In the beginning there was nothing apart from one other thing, the taste of ethyl formate, the chemical used in to make raspberry flavouring. So apart from cold, methane and raspberries, in the beginning there was nothing. Have I covered everything or was there anything else????'





There are many books out there that mention that great gags are written in formulas of three puns or can be mastered by intense practice.




My advice is just to practice with friends and on social networks. Try and not to let small groups of like minded people distract you from the most important goal, to tell a good joke that everyone can appreciate. Current affair jokes are in danger of becoming behind the times. Don’t be afraid to challenge world affairs like war, global warming. Despite political correctness regulating humour, we are fortunate to still live in a country that allows the freedom of speech. Just be aware of the current affairs dominating the headlines and show some courtesy to others by choosing the right time to tell a joke when you challenge an issue. Keep those jokes simple, have fun but remember, if you want to make it into a business then treat humour seriously. I would like to leave you with a classic Bob Monkhouse gag:







· ‘ They laughed when I said I was going to be a comedian. They're not laughing now.’



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-204832/Bobs-classic-liners.html#ixzz14SBWLyfR







Thank you for reading.







Haydn Lock


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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by LeahG on Sat 6 Nov - 22:04

Hi Haydn

Great to have you on the cartoonist forum, and majorly impressive and 'epic' advice there! Thank you Smile

Leah
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by haydnlock on Fri 26 Nov - 2:20

Humour and Racial Discrimination.


‘I don’t wish to be racist but….’ Every time I have heard that comment I can guarantee it is followed by a racist gag. Where I grew up, many decades ago, the N –WORD was used often without consequences. These are gags that should be avoided. They are dangerous and are not accepted in a diverse country where corporations are focused on equality to such an extreme that recent recruited employees are often asked what race, religion and sex they are on an equality form. Oddly corporations are not allowed to ask your age, by law, to prevent discrimination.

Racist material often floods the mobile networks and internet when there is a war, when immigration, benefits and unemployment stories are current news in papers and TV. However racism is not acceptable. Comedians of the past like, Chubby Brown, Jim Davidson, and Bernard Manning where paid to perform offensive racist material, although it was tongue and cheek, and influenced a generation of people to regurgitate their material. Often that generation would be encouraged by there parents who came from amazing times, the good old days, (Golden sixties) where the British public were proud of how safe their neighbourhoods were, because community spirit was encouraged.

In those days people where able to leave their houses front doors open. Their homes and their possessions were safe from theft. When the neighbourhood became an antisocial place to live in, those doors where fixed with more locks than a prison gate. In truth the sixties had enough antisocial behaviour to push black people and women to march in protest rallies for equal rights. The mentality of some people in that generation believed that women had smaller feet so they could get closer to the kitchen sink, black people were broadcasted on TV when a crime had been committed and your pet dog or cat was not safe when oriental people moved into the neighbourhood.


How times have changed. The neighbourhoods are a mix of races and integrated relationships; however, racism is still practiced maliciously or is softened by ignorance. White people still call black people coloured, whilst black people believe that white people are more coloured because they go white/green when ill, red when angry, and blue when cold.

This arrogance causes uncomfortable moments. I knew a white person who once got flustered in their own home after her niece introduced a black man as her boy friend in a dim hallway. Suddenly the pet dog began to bark. The Aunty panicked and said ‘So sorry, it does not like dark objects’. She panicked again because she thought her comment could be perceived as a racist remark. Without any thought she said ‘I didn’t mean your skin colour’, and dug a deeper hole as she tried to explain what she meant.

My favourite gags that tackled racism are from the movie ‘Blazing Saddles’ by Mel Brooks, and an episode in season 11 of South Park called the N Word guy. Both programmes consistently used the N word effectively. ‘Blazing Saddles’ told a story of a black slave in western times who became a Sheriff of a small town. This was against the wishes the white community. The story pokes fun at how ridiculous white people are when they used racist words. The film provoked complaints for its racism however it was written by Richard Pryor, actor, comedian, writer and a legend in black cinema history. The ‘South Park’ episode told a story where a white man was being discriminated by other white people for shouting the N-WORD live on a game show.

History has some dark racist stories and scars, not even time will heel, so be very aware when writing a gag that involves race. Attack the subject and not people when it comes to tackling racism. Below is a story that I attempted to tell about discrimination. Please click on the links







http://www.themagnificentmindofhaydnlock.com/resources/hippogriff1%20newsize.jpg

http://www.themagnificentmindofhaydnlock.com/resources/hippogriff2.jpg


Last edited by haydnlock on Fri 26 Nov - 6:50; edited 1 time in total
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Simon Lake on Fri 26 Nov - 8:01

You are so right Haydn. I steer well clear of anything to do with racism and am in fact very careful so as to not compose anything that may be misconstrued to this effect. As you say, they could get away with it in the old days but with the ever- increasing politically correct climate, it's just quite simply not worth it to bother.

We used to be allowed to play conkers without safety goggles don't forget and Monks used to be able to enter Shopping Malls. I learned very sharpishly not to even try to make a hint at racism, not that I have really had the inkling to. I once did a cartoon of a bloke in a cannibal's pot with the hubby cannibal coming home from work to be greeted by a note saying: "Your dinner is in distress". It just came to me as one of those old themes they used to milk in sunfun. Well I posted it another certain Forum and was gunned down from a dizzy height for being racist. Ppffft.....

People automatically assume that because I come from Zimbabwe and I am white that I am a racist. Some are even amazed that I am white and come from Zimbabwe. Hell, a lot of people haven't even heard it. Now I know a shit load of excellent racist jokes but you would have to meet me for a pint to hear them. And then I'd have to shoot you.


Last edited by Simon Lake on Fri 26 Nov - 8:12; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Racist slur (only joking))
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by haydnlock on Thu 23 Dec - 22:38

http://uk.tv.yahoo.com/23122010/19/boyle-facing-wave-complaints.html

A link about recent misinterpretation of the intentions of a comedian.
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by Simon Lake on Fri 24 Dec - 0:25

Never ceases to amaze me. The PC Brigade gone wrong again. But then again at the same time, Frankie should really have known better and he knows this goes with the territory. There's a time and a place for everything.
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by haydnlock on Tue 8 Feb - 0:05

Article Copied from the Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/top-gear/8302575/Top-Gear-apology-to-Mexico.html)


Top Gear apology to Mexico
The BBC has apologised to the Mexican ambassador over remarks made on Top Gear.

(L-R) Top Gear presenters Richard Hammond, Jeremy Clarkson and James May Photo: PA12:52PM GMT 04 Feb 2011
But the corporation defended the show's presenters, who branded Mexicans ''lazy'', ''feckless'' and ''flatulent'', saying national-stereotyping was part of British humour.

His Excellency Eduardo Medina-Mora Icaza wrote to the corporation to complain about the ''outrageous, vulgar and inexcusable insults''.

The BBC said it had now written to the ambassador to say it was sorry if the programme caused offence.

In a statement the corporation said the comments may have been ''rude'' and ''mischievous'', but there was no ''vindictiveness'' behind them.

It said: ''Our own comedians make jokes about the British being terrible cooks and terrible romantics, and we in turn make jokes about the Italians being disorganised and over dramatic, the French being arrogant and the Germans being over-organised.

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''Whilst it may appear offensive to those who have not watched the programme or who are unfamiliar with its humour, the executive producer has made it clear to the ambassador that that was absolutely not the show's intention.''

The BBC said stereotype-based comedy was allowed within its guidelines in programmes where the audience knew it could be expected.

The executive producer of Top Gear also apologised to the ambassador personally for remarks made about him.

In the episode, broadcast on January 30, Richard Hammond joked that Mexican cars reflected national characteristics, saying they were ''just going to be lazy, feckless, flatulent oaf with a moustache, leaning against a fence asleep, looking at a cactus with a blanket with a hole in the middle on as a coat''.

James May described Mexican food as ''like sick with cheese on it'' and Jeremy Clarkson predicted they would not get any complaints about the show because ''at the Mexican embassy, the ambassador is going to be sitting there with a remote control like this (snores). They won't complain, it's fine''.

In his letter to the BBC, the ambassador wrote: ''The presenters of the programme resorted to outrageous, vulgar and inexcusable insults to stir bigoted feelings against the Mexican people, their culture as well as their official representative in the United Kingdom.

''These offensive, xenophobic and humiliating remarks only serve to reinforce negative stereotypes and perpetuate prejudice against Mexico and its people.''

The ambassador demanded the show's hosts make a public apology and it remains to be seen if the BBC's response to his complaints have gone far enough.

Hundreds of Mexicans contacted the BBC to protest against the remarks which caused national outrage.

Yesterday a cross-party group of six MPs urged the BBC to apologise as ''a matter of urgency'', saying ''this level of ignorance is far below anything expected from anyone in the public eye and illustrates a serious lack of judgment by the programme-makers''.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg visits Mexico later this month.

It is not the first time the show, with its blend of motoring news, schoolboy humour and audacious stunts, has got into trouble.

In 2008 the show was rapped by the BBC Trust for showing Clarkson and May sipping gin and tonics at the wheel during a stunt.

Hundreds of viewers also complained after Clarkson made a joke about lorry drivers murdering prostitutes.

Interesting stuff

Regards

H R LOCK
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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by MRasheed on Wed 21 Mar - 18:53

Simon Lake wrote:It's all about association and how one thing can lead to another...

I decided about 7 gag 'toons ago to stop worrying about trying to capture the exact joke in a cartoon, and just use them as "association/inspiration."

Less stress involved. lol

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The Cartoonist's Muse: A Guide to Generating and Developing Creative Ideas

Post by Simon Lake on Mon 3 Sep - 15:06

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Re: How to find inspiration for gag cartoons and comic strips

Post by toddhicks209 on Thu 21 Jan - 1:20

To get passion for gag comics, follow your passion. Also, keep track of what your favorite cartoonists do and incorporate some of their ideas without completely copying their work.

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